Zeb and the Great Ruckus by Josh Donellan

June 29, 2013 Review 0 ★★★★★

Zeb and the Great Ruckus by Josh DonellanZeb and the Great Ruckus by Josh Donellan
Published by Odyssey Books on September 15, 2012
Genres: Children, Fantasy
Pages: 158
Format: eBook
Source: NetGalley
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five-stars
“This is a story made from pieces of all the dreams that you had when you were asleep, but then forgot when you woke up.”

Hello! You are reading this in order to determine whether or not this book will be of interest to you ! Well, congratulations, you obviously have fabulous taste! Zeb and the Great Ruckus is a story about magic, music, fireworks, bewilderbeasts, clockwork birds and weaponised toffee. It has some funny bits, some scary bits, some sad bits, and a rather large bit about a cave-dwelling ruttersnarl which we would tell you about but we don’t want to give away the ending. If you like the sounds of any or all of the above, then this is the book for you ! If you would rather read a complete history of European haberdashery, please consult your local book emporium.

Zeb and the Great Ruckus is a children’s book that really is suitable for any age. It’s short and excellently paced with adorable pictures sprinkled throughout. And like all good children’s books, the children are the heroes themselves. This is the story of Zeb, his friend Flip, and the extinct musical creatures who save the world from the evil ruler who has banished all music.

In most children’s books the adults are non-existent, or at best almost abusive in their lack of attention. That isn’t the case in this book, which is refreshing to see. Zeb’s father passed away, but his mother Serena is caring (even if she can’t cook), his teacher, Mr. Hemingdrake plays a large role, and Smokey, a musician and old family friend is also there. And the adults are good, and care about the children and yes, they notice when the kids go missing and bring them home safe and sound.

This book was full of humor, yet also told a serious story, and the language was vibrant with similes and metaphors to bring everything to life. Serena only spoke in rhymes, which made for an entertaining conversation whenever she was involved. And if nothing I say can intrigue you enough to read this book, then perhaps the authors own words can help:

This is a story made from pieces of all the dreams that you had when you were asleep, but then forgot when you woke up.

This is exactly how the story reads, too. Fragments of a forgotten dream that are stitched together in a fabulous tale.

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